First Hispanic Women to go to Space is Being Inducted into the Hall of Fame

Her name is Ellen Ochoa, and she was the first Latina women who made it to space. It was announced that on May 19th she will be inducted into the Astronaut Hall of Fame for her success.

A quote from Ms. Ochoa about the news; “I’m honored to be recognized among generations of astronauts who were at the forefront of exploring our universe for the benefit of humankind, I hope to continue to inspire our nation’s youth to pursue careers in science, technology, engineering, and math, so they, too, may reach for the stars.”

Ochoa is from Mexico and she joined NASA as a research engineer at Ames Research Center in 1988. By 1990, she moved onto the Johnson Space Center, where she was selected as an astronaut and made her historic trip to space in 1993.

Her success doesn’t stop there. Ochoa is currently the director of the Johnson Space Center in Houston, the second woman and first Latina to lead its 13,000 employees.

“Being an astronaut, and part of a team, is really rewarding, and now I have a different perspective,” she said when she first got the position four years ago, “the end goal is still the same – carrying out exciting and challenging mission in space.”

Hearing about successful Latinas as models or actors is something you would almost expect, but as an astronaut?!

Hearing about this story I knew I had to write about it, I know nothing about space and astronauts but when a Latina is being inducted into the hall of fame for it I’ll read into it.

This success for not only a woman but a Hispanic woman is monumental for the Hispanic community. Definitely something to be proud of!

All quotes and statistics are from;

http://www.vibe.com/2017/02/ellen-ochoa-first-latina-in-space-astronaut-hall-of-fame/

 

 

A Day Without Immigrants

This past Thursday immigrants all over the United States took a stand.

The stand they took was meant to demonstrate how important they are to America’s economy and its way of life, and many businesses closed in solidarity, in a nationwide protest called A Day Without Immigrants.

These Actions took place in places with large immigrant populations such as Philadelphia, Washington D.C and Los Angeles.

The boycott was aimed squarely at President Donald Trump’s efforts to crack down on immigration, legal and illegal. Organizers said they expected thousands to participate or otherwise show their support.

Since the end of 2007, the number of foreign-born workers employed in the U.S. has climbed by nearly 3.1 million to 25.9 million; they account for 56 percent of the increase in U.S. employment over that period, according to the Labor Department.

“The really important dynamic to note is this is not antagonistic, employee-against-employer,” said Janet Murguia, president of the Hispanic rights group National Council of La Raza. “This is employers and workers standing together, not in conflict.”

She added: “Businesses cannot function without immigrant workers today.” (CBS News)

I am a second generation Hispanic, both of my parents were born here. But they are both the youngest in their families and are the only ones in their families that were born in the U.S so my parents are first generations.

My grandparents, aunts and uncles are all immigrants. Granted they are Costa Rican and Puerto Rican immigrants and Mexican Immigrants are the ones getting the most attention, but in the end, they are still immigrants.

They came here legally looking for the American dream and if it wasn’t for their motivation and courage to come to America I don’t know where I would be today.

The immigration laws are controversial and not something I really want to get into, but immigrants themselves deserve to be here and are a very important part of the American day to day life.

Image result for a day without immigrants

The reason most immigrants come to the U.S and leave their homeland, is for a better opportunity for themselves and their family and to chase the American dream. Is there anything so wrong with that?!

In Washington, D.C., more than a hundred-people gathered to march in acknowledgement of A Day Without Immigrants, CBS News’ Nicole Sganga reported. There were boisterous crowds, musicians, handmade drums, young kids, and large banners reading “they will not build borders in our community,” “immigrants work for America’s prosperity” and “We have a right to an education! To a future!” (CVS News)

Quotes and statistics gathered from: http://www.cbsnews.com/news/day-without-immigrants-protest-closes-many-us-restaurants-nationwide/?ftag=CNM-00-10aab7e&linkId=34589722

Disney’s First Hispanic Princess

Elena of Avalor is the first Hispanic princess Disney has made a television series about “a brave and adventurous teenager who has saved her kingdom from an evil sorceress and must now learn to rule as crown princess until she is old enough to be queen.”

“She’s still underage so she’s not yet ready to rule and so, she just has the challenge of taking care of her family and this huge kingdom and have this awesome responsibility,” said actress Aimee Carrero, who is the voice of Elena.

Carrero’s mother is of Dominican decent and her father is Puerto Rican. Carrero said it means “absolutely everything” for her to play the first Latina princess.

The series will tell stories that draw on the traditions, foods and customs of Latin and Hispanic cultures. Magic, mythology and folklore will also play an important role, and each episode will include original songs in several Latin musical styles including Latin pop, salsa and banda.

For me as a Puerto Rican and Costa Rican girl growing up seeing all these beautiful princess’ I could never really relate to any of them. The one I related to the most was Jasmine because she had tan skin and long black hair, but she is obviously of Arabic decent.

“What I love most about Elena is she’s her own hero,” Carrero added. “There’s no ‘Prince Charming,’ so I hope people at home watching will just be inspired her sense of self, her confidence and her leadership.”

This is the best part for me, because being a Hispanic female there’s expectations and stereotypes that come with the title. So, the fact she is an independent princess with no prince makes it all the more riveting and exciting to watch. I’m sure eventually there will be a prince but her independence for the time being is fun to experience.

Through the recent years, they have done an amazing job bringing more ethnic princesses to the big screen. The most recent one I have seen is Moana and she is a Polynesian princess, that was a great movie might I add.

But I can definitely say the progress being made with princess is great and I love finally having a princess I can relate to and my little cousins can finally have a princess Barbie doll they will look like.

Source: http://abcnews.go.com/Entertainment/disney-introduces-latina-princess-elena-avalor/story?id=40481827