First Hispanic Women to go to Space is Being Inducted into the Hall of Fame

Her name is Ellen Ochoa, and she was the first Latina women who made it to space. It was announced that on May 19th she will be inducted into the Astronaut Hall of Fame for her success.

A quote from Ms. Ochoa about the news; “I’m honored to be recognized among generations of astronauts who were at the forefront of exploring our universe for the benefit of humankind, I hope to continue to inspire our nation’s youth to pursue careers in science, technology, engineering, and math, so they, too, may reach for the stars.”

Ochoa is from Mexico and she joined NASA as a research engineer at Ames Research Center in 1988. By 1990, she moved onto the Johnson Space Center, where she was selected as an astronaut and made her historic trip to space in 1993.

Her success doesn’t stop there. Ochoa is currently the director of the Johnson Space Center in Houston, the second woman and first Latina to lead its 13,000 employees.

“Being an astronaut, and part of a team, is really rewarding, and now I have a different perspective,” she said when she first got the position four years ago, “the end goal is still the same – carrying out exciting and challenging mission in space.”

Hearing about successful Latinas as models or actors is something you would almost expect, but as an astronaut?!

Hearing about this story I knew I had to write about it, I know nothing about space and astronauts but when a Latina is being inducted into the hall of fame for it I’ll read into it.

This success for not only a woman but a Hispanic woman is monumental for the Hispanic community. Definitely something to be proud of!

All quotes and statistics are from;

http://www.vibe.com/2017/02/ellen-ochoa-first-latina-in-space-astronaut-hall-of-fame/

 

 

A Day Without Immigrants

This past Thursday immigrants all over the United States took a stand.

The stand they took was meant to demonstrate how important they are to America’s economy and its way of life, and many businesses closed in solidarity, in a nationwide protest called A Day Without Immigrants.

These Actions took place in places with large immigrant populations such as Philadelphia, Washington D.C and Los Angeles.

The boycott was aimed squarely at President Donald Trump’s efforts to crack down on immigration, legal and illegal. Organizers said they expected thousands to participate or otherwise show their support.

Since the end of 2007, the number of foreign-born workers employed in the U.S. has climbed by nearly 3.1 million to 25.9 million; they account for 56 percent of the increase in U.S. employment over that period, according to the Labor Department.

“The really important dynamic to note is this is not antagonistic, employee-against-employer,” said Janet Murguia, president of the Hispanic rights group National Council of La Raza. “This is employers and workers standing together, not in conflict.”

She added: “Businesses cannot function without immigrant workers today.” (CBS News)

I am a second generation Hispanic, both of my parents were born here. But they are both the youngest in their families and are the only ones in their families that were born in the U.S so my parents are first generations.

My grandparents, aunts and uncles are all immigrants. Granted they are Costa Rican and Puerto Rican immigrants and Mexican Immigrants are the ones getting the most attention, but in the end, they are still immigrants.

They came here legally looking for the American dream and if it wasn’t for their motivation and courage to come to America I don’t know where I would be today.

The immigration laws are controversial and not something I really want to get into, but immigrants themselves deserve to be here and are a very important part of the American day to day life.

Image result for a day without immigrants

The reason most immigrants come to the U.S and leave their homeland, is for a better opportunity for themselves and their family and to chase the American dream. Is there anything so wrong with that?!

In Washington, D.C., more than a hundred-people gathered to march in acknowledgement of A Day Without Immigrants, CBS News’ Nicole Sganga reported. There were boisterous crowds, musicians, handmade drums, young kids, and large banners reading “they will not build borders in our community,” “immigrants work for America’s prosperity” and “We have a right to an education! To a future!” (CVS News)

Quotes and statistics gathered from: http://www.cbsnews.com/news/day-without-immigrants-protest-closes-many-us-restaurants-nationwide/?ftag=CNM-00-10aab7e&linkId=34589722